Pear Ravioli

This Pear Ravioli is the second and final installment of ravioli recipes my family learned together during our cooking class many years ago.

If you recall from my entry about Pumpkin Ravioli, I had a couple of ideas that I thought would make this process easier. One idea was to use an ice cube tray to help me portion the filling. That didn’t quite work out, so I am now thinking getting a ravioli gadget is worth it.

That being said, I felt my ability to do this manually so to speak went a lot smoother. I still had some imperfectly shaped ravioli, but I feel with more practice and some gadgets my problems with ravioli will be solved.

Keeping all of this in mind, the great news about making your own ravioli is that even if you mess it up, it’ll still taste yummy. I can’t make that case for everything, but knowing this is great for your morale if you end up struggling.

What you’ll need

  • 1 cup of fresh pears, peeled and diced
  • 1 cup of grated parmesan, asiago, or percorino cheese
  • 3/4 cup of ricotta cheese
  • 1 cup of cream
  • 4 tablespoons of butter
  • 2/3-1 cup of parmesan

Our first step will be to make the filling and that consists of combing the pears, ricotta cheese, and the grated cheese of your choice from above.

Just mix those three ingredients together and then set aside.

The sauce and filling are a breath of fresh air to make. The real challenge is making the ravioli and that challenging process begins with making your own dough.

When making my pasta dough, I enjoy this recipe and culinary lesson of making pasta by this wonderful pasta scientist. She breaks down all the different ways you can make dough and the science behind it. My mother always said cooking is a lot like chemistry and this article makes that apparent. You can find her informative article here.

Once you’ve made your dough, the next step is to pull apart a quarter of your round dough ball and flatten that with a roller or pasta maker into a large rectangular shape. This step will be repeated until it’s all gone by the way. Taking only a 1/4 just helps maintain the portion we need for each batch.

By the way, feel free to look up how to make ravioli on that same link from above. There are other articles on that site and one of them is specifically for ravioli.

Back to my own process, once I made this rectangular shape, I attempted to use my ice cub tray as a measuring tool of filling size and more.

It did help me determine how large each ravioli piece should be, but it wasn’t as useful as I had hoped. I ended up discarding the tray and folding the dough in half from top to bottom after I placed my filling.

To place the filling I used a teaspoon to scoop out my filling. Then I placed that filling on the bottom portion of the rectangle about an inch above the border and the center of the bottom half. Each ball of filling was about 2 inches apart, give or take. That part is pretty easy to eye ball.

Once my filling was placed, that’s when I folded the top half over the bottom. I then used my fingers to sculpt the ravioli by creating a border between each piece and pushing the filling even more into a circular shape.

Once I felt things were even, I then cut the dough to separate each ravioli piece from the other and with a fork indented lines around the border.

While you’re making the ravioli by the way, I do suggest you boil a pot of water, so that once the ravioli is done you can just dump it in to cook.

That process should take around 7 minutes and while it’s boiling is the perfect time to make your sauce.

Making the sauce is even easier than making the filling. All you do is heat the cream, butter, and parmesan in a sauce pan until the cheese and butter has melted. Salt and pepper to taste and that’s all she wrote for the sauce.

Now all we need to do is strain the water once the ravioli is done cooking and serve individually with the sauce on top like below.

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This is another challenging recipe that I personally want to improve on, but turned out well despite that fact. I need to be more patient and thin out the dough more, because I always end up with leftover filling and thick pasta.

I enjoyed the pear version over the pumpkin as well. Sweet pear bites go well with bland (that’s my opinion) ricotta and that cream sauce is simple but comforting and yummy.

Despite the challenges you might face, I think this recipe is worth trying out because even if you fail with the ravioli, it’ll still taste good. Just maybe don’t serve it to any judgemental people in your life until you perfect it. If you care about their judginess that is. I personally enjoy making judgy people squirm sometimes. That sentence alone I’m sure has caused a great disturbance in the grammar police force. As I type it, it’s as if millions of voices suddenly cried out in terror.

It’s good for their mental health to be challenged to relax a little don’t you think?

Hopefully it is, otherwise I’m being seduced by the dark side and could use some help.

 

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